Posted in Based On True Events, General, Inspirational, Non-Fiction

The Compliment.

People close to me know that I dislike praises. I might appreciate you, if I liked something you did, but I feel shy on receiving them. In the month of February, I attended a friend’s wedding with one of my close friends. We set our arrival dates to match together so that we land around the same time. It’s good to attend weddings because you not only get to bless the bride and groom, but you also get to meet new people and especially various kinds of elders.

My close friend (who I was staying with during the wedding and with whom I planned our itinerary) and I had already decided that we are going to perform at the bride’s Sangeet. Both of us were called ‘the guests from Dubai’ at the wedding. You don’t expect so many international invitees if it’s a local Indian wedding. The bride’s side were kind and were very happy to have us.

We had practiced a few times in Dubai and a couple of quick practices before the performances (because I was nervous). I dislike screwing it up. After watching and cheering for all other performances, the moment arrived.

We danced on the two numbers we had and as usual I forgot almost all the main steps but luckily I didn’t screw up completely because my dance partner knew them all. Hence, I wasn’t looking straight at the audience, well, most of the time.

The bride’s side had booked a beautiful villa/lodge, where all the small events and rituals would take place and it had a lot of rooms. So, most of the guests who had come from different states were living in it, including us. It didn’t take us time to get mixing with the relatives. Even though most of them were our parent’s age or even older. There were, however, a few of our age – who were the bride’s college or school mates.

We would all, gather around every morning, for breakfast in the same hall downstairs. Eat and mingle together. The morning after the Sangeet happened, we were standing at the buffet and there was this uncle who has been an ex-military colonel, who I had had a good conversation with, during the previous breakfasts. We were all at the line of buffet and all the elders were already finished with their breakfasts long before us because we always were the late comers.

He stopped me, pulled me out of the queue gently, to tell me something. I was shocked at first, thinking what was going on. I was scared for a minute thinking what did I do wrong!?

Fortunately, it wasn’t something wrong that I did, it was something miraculous. It was not intended but I am REALLY glad that I could make a person feel that way. The uncle, who was from the bride’s side, obviously, was decent and elegant. He carried a great persona, yet, was a little old fashioned.

What he said, not only gave me goosebumps, but it also made me realize that not only money can buy happiness, even a compliment can and only a few words can make someone eternally happy.

His approximate words were, “Beta, what you did last night on the dance floor definitely entertained us. The joy you brought us from your spirit of dancing not only helped me be happier but it also made my health better at that point of time. Keep doing this. God bless you with all the happiness and good luck for your future endeavors.”

I was smiling, constantly. I was blushing. I went numb for a few seconds. My thank yous were sounding like whispers. I had goosebumps. I hadn’t felt this awestruck since maybe forever. I felt on top of the world.

Thus, I just wanted to share this with all my readers. Please never stop doing good things in life. You never know, you might unintentionally make someone’s day. Stay happy. Keep smiling, no matter what. And thank you for reading.

Posted in Based On True Events, Black Comedy, Bollywood, Crime, Drama, Inspirational, Non-Fiction

Udta Punjab – Worth the fight.

A combination of three individual stories packed inside a big box of a huge topic, drugs, of course. It is a power packed quad-bonanza film!

I want to kick-start by praising the background score (Benedict Taylor and Naren Chandavarkar) and the music (Amit Trivedi). Both suited the flick’s plot and screenplay so perfectly. Moreover, the make-up artist(s), the director, Abhishek Chaubey and the writer Sudip Sharma have done a fantastic job on each character, especially Alia Bhatt. I was actually amazed when her first scene rolled in.

Furthermore, I was astounded by the talent of Diljit Dosanjh. He is already great behind the mic and now in front of the camera too. Kareena Kapoor Khan had a short yet inspirational role. It was a treat to see Satish Kaushik (as Tayaji) after a very long time. It is also aspiring to see new talent up on the boat, Prabhjyot Singh (as Balli Singh) and a couple more supporting roles, Harpreet Singh (as Samsheer) and Bhawsheel Singh Sahni (as Lucky). Plus, films like Haider and Udta Punjab define Shahid Kapoor as an actor. It brings a lot out of him and the audience gets to witness his sheer talent and what all he is capable of.

It is a well scrutinized plot by Sudip Sharma where he proficiently creates three different stories involving Tejinder “Tommy” Singh / Gabru (Shahid) in the first. Bauriya (Alia) in the second, who works in a farm to earn a living since she couldn’t do much in her hockey career and Dr. Preet Sahni (Kareena) who works secretly with Sartaj Singh (Diljit) in the third, to catch the enemy of the Punjab youth, i.e. the bringer of all kind of drugs to the state.

Look, I wouldn’t divide the two halves of the film and compare them with each other i.e. which one was better or slower, it is the whole film divided by a 10 minute interval in between. Every film has a tempo and it tends to increase or decrease according to the story. Agreed, the tempo turns a bit towards the slower side after the break but that doesn’t mean it was bad, it was a part of the film and it is acceptable.

This flick IS based on a very controversial affair [as we all know] and that has been portrayed very smartly in the film. A tad bit of laughter is promised as well. Hence, go for it. It is worth it.

4/5