Posted in Action, Fiction, Hollywood, SciFi, Thriller

Gemini Man – Expectations into the bin.

When you tend to over-promote or market a film a bit too much, moviegoers usually get a hint as to what kind of film it might be. The best films normally don’t need awareness. They automatically become popular by word of mouth. The best way.

It is hard to believe that lead actor Will Smith and director Ang Lee actually believed in a story which might have taken 20 years to finalize but STILL proves to be the most common and gray concept, CLONING. The only reason I decided to go for this film was Will Smith because of my recently born love for him after I completed the TV series, The Fresh Prince Of Bel-Air.

There are no complaints when the performances of Smith or even the supporting cast, Mary Elizabeth Winstead (as Danny Zakarweski), Clive Owen (as Clayton “Clay” Varris) and Benedict Wong (as Baron) are concerned. It is, yet again, the idea of the plot (originally by Lemke) and the screenplay which is completely outdated. Smith is going about everywhere, boasting the kind of technology which has been used in this film for it’s own benefit. Yet, the purpose it is serving or the reason it is being used for is literally of the golden era.

The approach of the film and constant change of locations really reminded me of the last week’s Bollywood release, War. There certainly were editing blunders, which were very much crystal for the naked eye. Especially in the last scene. It is quite shocking that Gemini Man hails from a director who has created marvelous films like Life Of Pi and Brokeback Mountain. However, the trio responsible for the bizarre tale are David Benioff (writer of Game Of Thrones and Troy), Billy Ray (co-writer of Hunger Games) and Darren Lemke (co-writer of Shazam! and Shrek Forever After). Mistakes do happen. And this is one of them for the these three, assuredly.

1/5

Posted in Action, Adventure, Comedy, Drama, Fiction, Hollywood, SciFi, Superhero, Technology

Spider-Man: Far From Home – My restrained views.

It is so difficult to write about Marvel films without letting out a spoiler. Especially in the second installment of this franchise.

It is a fun film. As usual. Since it gives you a very teenage kind of feeling, everything is really advanced, rapid and modern. I loved Chris McKenna and Eric Sommers‘s script, having just the right amount of everything. The story put through is obviously the next chapter, post Avengers: End Game and explains casually, how Peter Parker is affected, after the sad demise of Tony Stark (Iron Man).

The direction (by Jon Watts – who also directed the first part) is great. The technological/graphical parts of the film [which is most of the film] will impress you. A lot. It is really mind blowing what all you can create by just putting green screens everywhere around the actors and letting a computer do it’s part. Undoubtedly, the graphic and/or VFX (visual effects) designers do most of it.

One thing I couldn’t understand is that how Mary Jane’s (MJ) character has completely taken a turn from what we had witnessed in the Tobey Maguire‘s Spider-Man series. Herein, MJ (played by Zendaya) is completely obsessed with Peter Parker [and weirdly stalks him too] since the first part, Spider-Man: Homecoming. It was a complete different scenario in Sam Raimi‘s directed Spider-Man franchise.

It is rejuvenating to have a new character, Jake Gyllenhaal (as Mysterio) who actually enhanced the film. He is truly a brilliant actor. Sober, yet effective. The twists and turns in this sequel, along with great suspenseful moments will keep surprising you every now and then. The comedy portion is a little less, however present, compared to other Marvel films.

Everything has changed, ever since the brilliant Tom Holland (as Peter Parker/Spider-Man) has taken over. The costumes, the actors, the names, the villains. For the most basic examples, Aunt May/May Parker’s character is now played by the sizzling Marisa Tomei or Peter Parker has a best friend, Ned Leeds (played by Jacob Batalon). Beginning from 2002, what Spider-Man (played by Tobey Maguire) used to be and what it is now. How the characters revolving around him have altered. How Spider-Man got involved with Avengers. The inclusion of Tony Stark/Iron Man in his life. I have accepted it. It’s great. Yet, deep down somewhere in my heart, I will always miss Tobey Maguire. What he created on the screen was something else. Unspeakable. Magic.

4/5

Posted in Action, Adventure, Animation, Cartoon, Comedy, Fiction, Hollywood, SciFi

Pokémon Detective Pikachu – Reminiscing, slightly.

I wasn’t going to watch this film for Pokémon or the characters and hell I didn’t even know many of them. What really got my attention was when I read that Ryan Reynolds has given his crazy voice to the character of Pikachu. The Deadpool star is one of my favorite actors because of his great sense of humor.

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This collaboration of actual human actors and Pokémon monsters was really well thought of, yet, lacks so much in the story and the addition of various other characters/monsters. There are 812, according to Wikipedia. It is a secret as to why Reynolds adds his comedic manly touch to the cute, adorable Pikachu, which, shall be revealed way after the climax of the flick.

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Inclusive of a display of some next-generation technology, some great graphical representation, this film is adventurous. It has a good portion of comedy, thanks to Ryan Reynolds, of course. Rob Letterman, the director, who has made a few beautiful films in the past, unfortunately, couldn’t bring out the charisma, which was very much required in this game-adapted Pokémon Detective Pikachu.

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Apart from some moments of recollection of our good old memories concerning this legendary Japanese game and characters (or monsters) [which has been played on various different mediums since 1995], there are only a few notable things this film has to offer. Which reminds me to mention about a superb upcoming actor, Justice Smith (as Tim Goodman). With great dialogue delivery and facial expressions, he is quite the impressive one. A year younger to him, the female lead, Kathryn Newton (as Lucy Stevens) still has a few skills to master, however, is not that bad an actor. Probably experience shall teach the pretty one some more.

2/5

Posted in Action, Drama, Fiction, Hollywood, SciFi, Superhero, Technology

Avengers: End Game – No spoilers inside.

Over the decades, we were made to believe that superheroes always save the day and it always ends on the note of happily ever after. Post Avengers: Infinity War, the directors (Anthony & Joe) took the Avengers series to the next level. It had grown older. It had bigger wings. It had a more realistic and a mature approach. It has reached beyond the point where the graphical representation, the actors’ performances or even the photographic work are being praised. We are way past that. Hence, it is the plot or script where it must actually flourish.

Admitting, that this one had a mediocre start. A little laid back. Possibly more practical. More human-like. The most longed-for film is huge, yet, it is not what I wanted it to be, or as per my assumption and what many of the moviegoers [especially Marvel fans] might have wanted it to be. However, it makes you run through a lot of emotions. It is inclusive of a few applause-worthy and whistle-worthy scenes. Avengers: End Game has explained the term C’est La Vie, very conspicuously. Two factors which were supported and displayed in a crystal manner, were feminism and racism. In my opinion, these factors are supposed to be conveyed very indirectly. Furthermore, this motion picture is running for twenty four hours in a few parts of the world. It has already made double of it’s investment, in the matter of two days. Fans have watched it five to six times already. That is something!

It is beautiful how Anthony and Joe Russo stitched the ten years of films of the MCU along with the End Game, combining the past, the present and the future and gave it a sense of completion. The appreciable factor is that the audience were kind and lived up to Russo brothers’ expectations and made sure to follow their appeal. Moreover, it is also important that you know that if you are expecting any after credit scenes [which Marvel fans usually do; even I did], there aren’t any. And a more pressing matter is that if you haven’t been following all the rest of the Marvel Cinematic Universe flicks, you WILL not understand the details of the characters and the film.

If I talk any more about the flick, the chances of a disclosure is very high.

3.5/5

Posted in Action, Drama, Fiction, Hollywood, SciFi, Superhero, Technology

Captain Marvel – Keep low expectations.

When we come to analyze introductory films for Marvel characters or even DC characters, they coincidentally turn out to be at the level of mediocrity. If comparing Black Panther with this film, as it pretty much matches with it in terms of timing of release before the new Avengers film or even for an intro for a new character, it felt a lot more wholesome in front of this.

Something or the other always is inadequate. Speaking about Captain Marvel, which was hyped when it’s trailer came out, Brie Larson gives her utmost best to be pitch perfect for the role of Carol Danvers / Vers, by being confident, seeming powerful and acting fearlessly.

The supporting characters (Jude Law, Samuel. L. Jackson, Lashana Lynch, Ben Mendelsohn and Annette Bening) prove their worthiness of existing in the movie. Because, I personally feel, Larson couldn’t have been able to do it on her own.

The action bit comes a little later in the film as the theoritical history needed to be shown and how it all started for her. What I loved most about the film were the use of advanced technology and a pretty 90’s background score (by Pinar Toprak), apt for the era the film is being shown from.

Without being even remotely sexist, I wished that there would have been a male character portraying Capt. Marvel. There had been a lot of various comics where a female was created to portray as one but Stan Lee created the character with a male in mind. In fact, when the character of Captain Marvel was launched in the comics, it was a he.

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How much ever the duo Anna Boden & Ryan Fleck tried to make this film better with their beautiful direction, they couldn’t do much on the screenplay and story along with the other writers. It lacked that spark.

3.5/5

Posted in Action, Animation, Biographical, Drama, Hollywood, SciFi, Technology

Alita: Battle Angel – Basic stuff.

It is not a complicated story. A simple one, rather. It is about a cyborg, who was found in the trash, but, is meant to be legendary.

Such films mainly depend on their graphic designing team. James Cameron’s name is enough to attract the audience to watch a spectacle. It is directed by Spy Kids series director Robert Rodriguez and Cameron only writes the screenplay for it. I mainly got attracted to watch this film just because of it’s technological ingredient.

While Christoph Waltz, Jennifer Connelly, Keean Johnson, Mahearshala Ali and Ed Skrein support the cute Rosa Salazar, the lead actress, with their full potential, Alita: Battle Angel fails to actually deliver a proper plot.

Based on the Japanese manga series known as Gunnm by Yukito Kishiro, this flick is able to climb the ladder with the help of the fortifying cast, a great display of tech and a little bit of good action.

3/5

Posted in Action, Hollywood, SciFi, Superhero, Technology

Aquaman – The foible standalone.

I had been hearing and reading about the bad, the average and the very few good reviews about this motion picture. The trailer told a rejuvenating tale which had already convinced me a couple of months ago. Notwithstanding, I made the call, took a leap of faith and booked my tickets.

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I am really glad that Aquaman was made, not because it’s the best film you can watch under the DC Comics banner [No, I wouldn’t concur.] but because this individual film was necessary as it’s brief introduction in Justice League just wasn’t enough. Also, on behalf of the audience, we really need to witness something out of the usual, in this not-so-medieval times, even refreshing perhaps, apart from the Batmans and the Supermans.

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From a tad role in HBO’S superhit TV series Game Of Thrones to becoming one of the coolest characters of DC Comics, Jason Momoa (as Arthur Curry / Aquaman) has come up a long way. A well earned role [suiting his real personality] and elevation. His wild and high-voltage nature, off-screen, really helped him in developing this character and giving it a bit of a different angle. Amber Heard plays the worthy lead character of Mera. Willem Dafoe as Nuidis Vulko is as amazing as he could get. Patrick Wilson as Orm honestly wasn’t that convincing as the antagonist. Nicole Kidman still looks like she is 28 and acts with the experience of her actual age, played the beautiful Atlana/Queen Of Atlantis. Yahya Abdul Mateen ΙΙ in as David Kane / Black Manta performs really well but was shown as a little insignificant.

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The plot/screenplay being barely more than average, depends on the graphics/VFX to fill the holes it comprises. Now, this being mostly an under water film [as the title suggests too], the detailing of the graphics wasn’t actually that bad. However, when talking about showing scenes from the year 1985, when Temuera Morrison (as Thomas Curry) and Nicole Kidman had to play younger characters, I don’t know whether it was the actual plastic make-up on their faces or it was the VFX doing that but it looked awfully displeasing.

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Moreover, the background score is very childish, especially in the action scenes. Apart from these noteworthy errors, there are a few glitches which are really lowering DC’s standards. James Wan didn’t really give his best, when it came to direction. Beating to that, Don Burgess with excellent cinematography and the heart-stopping action kept us glued to our seats.

3/5