Avengers: End Game – No spoilers inside.

Over the decades, we were made to believe that superheroes always save the day and it always ends on the note of happily ever after. Post Avengers: Infinity War, the directors (Anthony & Joe) took the Avengers series to the next level. It had grown older. It had bigger wings. It had a more realistic and a mature approach. It has reached beyond the point where the graphical representation, the actors’ performances or even the photographic work are being praised. We are way past that. Hence, it is the plot or script where it must actually flourish.

Admitting, that this one had a mediocre start. A little laid back. Possibly more practical. More human-like. The most longed-for film is huge, yet, it is not what I wanted it to be, or as per my assumption and what many of the moviegoers [especially Marvel fans] might have wanted it to be. However, it makes you run through a lot of emotions. It is inclusive of a few applause-worthy and whistle-worthy scenes. Avengers: End Game has explained the term C’est La Vie, very conspicuously. Two factors which were supported and displayed in a crystal manner, were feminism and racism. In my opinion, these factors are supposed to be conveyed very indirectly. Furthermore, this motion picture is running for twenty four hours in a few parts of the world. It has already made double of it’s investment, in the matter of two days. Fans have watched it five to six times already. That is something!

It is beautiful how Anthony and Joe Russo stitched the ten years of films of the MCU along with the End Game, combining the past, the present and the future and gave it a sense of completion. The appreciable factor is that the audience were kind and lived up to Russo brothers’ expectations and made sure to follow their appeal. Moreover, it is also important that you know that if you are expecting any after credit scenes [which Marvel fans usually do; even I did], there aren’t any. And a more pressing matter is that if you haven’t been following all the rest of the Marvel Cinematic Universe flicks, you WILL not understand the details of the characters and the film.

If I talk any more about the flick, the chances of a disclosure is very high.

3.5/5

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Captain Marvel – Keep low expectations.

When we come to analyze introductory films for Marvel characters or even DC characters, they coincidentally turn out to be at the level of mediocrity. If comparing Black Panther with this film, as it pretty much matches with it in terms of timing of release before the new Avengers film or even for an intro for a new character, it felt a lot more wholesome in front of this.

Something or the other always is inadequate. Speaking about Captain Marvel, which was hyped when it’s trailer came out, Brie Larson gives her utmost best to be pitch perfect for the role of Carol Danvers / Vers, by being confident, seeming powerful and acting fearlessly.

The supporting characters (Jude Law, Samuel. L. Jackson, Lashana Lynch, Ben Mendelsohn and Annette Bening) prove their worthiness of existing in the movie. Because, I personally feel, Larson couldn’t have been able to do it on her own.

The action bit comes a little later in the film as the theoritical history needed to be shown and how it all started for her. What I loved most about the film were the use of advanced technology and a pretty 90’s background score (by Pinar Toprak), apt for the era the film is being shown from.

Without being even remotely sexist, I wished that there would have been a male character portraying Capt. Marvel. There had been a lot of various comics where a female was created to portray as one but Stan Lee created the character with a male in mind. In fact, when the character of Captain Marvel was launched in the comics, it was a he.

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How much ever the duo Anna Boden & Ryan Fleck tried to make this film better with their beautiful direction, they couldn’t do much on the screenplay and story along with the other writers. It lacked that spark.

3.5/5

Alita: Battle Angel – Basic stuff.

It is not a complicated story. A simple one, rather. It is about a cyborg, who was found in the trash, but, is meant to be legendary. 

Such films mainly depend on their graphic designing team. James Cameron’s name is enough to attract the audience to watch a spectacle. It is directed by Spy Kids series director Roberto Rodriguez and Cameron only writes the screenplay for it. I mainly got attracted to watch this film just because of it’s technological ingredient.

While Christoph Waltz, Jennifer Connelly, Keean Johnson, Mahearshala Ali and Ed Skrein support the cute Rosa Salazar, the lead actress, with their full potential, Alita: Battle Angel fails to actually deliver a proper plot.

Based on the Japanese manga series known as Gunnm by Yukito Kishiro, this flick is able to climb the ladder with the help of it’s fortifying cast, a great display of tech and a little bit of good action. 

3/5